Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Tight...

Center of the pocket, one side viewed
from underneath
Slingmoore's 2015All Blacks are entering production, here's one side of the back of the pocket receiving it's ever so subtle pinch for the perfectly rounded pocket.  The funny thing is that I have tried making metrics for exactly where these holes should go and the results were disastrous.  In the end, the eye-balled holes were better.  I can't explain this beyond sometimes experience is better than anything.

Monday, April 27, 2015

Slinging at the Teesta

Nothing like slinging at a swift river with no shortage of rocks... I'm amazed at how picky I've become.  In Kentucky I would sling anything, asphalt, pinecones, I was so desperate for projectiles... but here, if it doesn't look like I could cook it sunny side up and slap it on my grits, then I don't even give it a second look...

Slinging at the Teesta

Nothing like slinging at a swift river with no shortage of rocks... I'm amazed at how picky I've become. In the U.S. I would sling anything, asphalt, pinecones, I even slung an empty bottle once...(by the way...don't do that) I was so desperate for projectiles... but here, if it doesn't look like I could cook it sunny side up and slap it on my grits, then I don't even give it a second look... behold Teesta Slinging


Friday, April 24, 2015

Good sling curing practices

It's simple, a good eggish rock and some time. Make sure your rock is centered, and be patient.  It's wise to store your sling like this while your slinging in your dreams, because otherwise, it should be in your pocket or backpack ready for action.  And by "action" I mean, that rare moment when an open field, and a projectile and your sling collide in the same space-time.

Friday, April 17, 2015

Slingmoore secret revealed

Drumroll... Hemostat during hole punching.  There... I said it, secret's out.  Oh... that, and a really nice cutting board.

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Waste Not Sling Moore

Cleaning up today I noticed that my waste pile was infinitesimally small, with the addition of one small leaf piece.  Why is this note worthy?  Because it means your sling from Slingmoore hasn't been hacked and chopped ultimately reducing strength... But rather your sling has the strength that only wholeness can deliver.

Friday, April 10, 2015

Out of the nursery

slings in the raw, with two other
essentials:
see through omni straight edge and
coffee.
As slingmoore's 2015 all-black slings exit the nursery they are cut to length. Two things you need at this point, first, coffee, enough said on that point. Second, here at slingmoore we craft slings in small batches. Partly because we are always running out of gear, but the more poignant reason is that small batches allow for constant innovation. With this batch of four I'll experiment on one sling with a slightly longer pocket. Quality...that's what we're about here... Oh and chucking stuff...yes, chucking stuff and quality.

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Punching for the stays

punching the holes for the stays
Great leather is a dime a dozen but well punched holes who can find?  This is usually the moment that I make or break a sling.  Knots can be retied and stays restrung but once you've punched you're committed.  I have thrown away many slings just after doing this wrong.  Can you believe I stopped in the midst of the strain to snap a photo? 

Friday, April 3, 2015

The monkey fist trigger... knot to worry

glazed bead handles and
monkey first triggers in waiting.
Tutorials on tying monkey fists and sheep-shanks have entire YouTube channels devoted to them so I won't go into it. But I will say that recently I started tying a simple overhand with the smallest of tails and centering it within the fist for a harder more spherical trigger.  But the best thing about the monkey fist is that it doesn't shatter upon it's first encounter with the ground, a common problem with beaded triggers.  Plus although it's hard as a rock, it doesn't hurt nearly as much as a wood on the rare occasions that it whips around to bite you on the cheek. Slingmoore always recommends wearing eye protection when slinging.  The glazed beads for the handles aren't a problem because it never leaves your hand.